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Posted on May 17, 2017

Easy chicken for busy fitness fanatics

food

uk food prep high protein

Since I started watching American fitness YouTubers last year, I was always jealous of all their high protein food they got sent to their door. I did have a look for a company that provided something similar in the UK but couldn’t find anything.

It’s hard to be healthy when you are struggling for time – I find that I’m so busy, I just go for the easy option of cheese on toast rather than making something low fat and high protein.

Enter Gold Standard Nutrition, a company that contacted me and offered to send me some frozen cooked chicken and sauces.

The chicken has 30g of protein per breast which is great for those wanting to eat more protein, or just eat well. They’re also simple – you can defrost them and eat cold, or put in the oven for 20 minutes to warm up.

They’re great for meal prep for work, I’ve been making salads and getting a piece of chicken out on an evening to defrost and then I’m good to go in the morning to take it work.

You can find out more, or buy for yourself here.

uk food prep high protein uk food prep high protein

uk food prep high protein

uk food prep high protein

uk food prep high protein

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Posted on May 5, 2017

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

food

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

Pulsin’s products are packed full of natural ingredients and organic goodness, and are free from all sweeteners, flavourings, preservatives or colourings. I love products like this, so when they offered to send me some I was like YES PLEASE.

The range includes protein powder, protein bars and brownies. There are products tailored for all dietary needs including vegetarian, vegan, soya free, paleo, gluten free, dairy free, lactose intolerant and organic.

Perfect for a pre-workout snack or just something to put you on until your next meal – the orange one was my favourite as I’m a sucker for orange chocolate.

I’ve seen these in the free from section at the supermarket – so the next time you see them, give em a go!

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

Pulsin Energy and Protein Bars

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Posted on February 28, 2017

The Beginner’s Guide to Protein Powder

exercise/ food

The Beginner's Guide to Protein Powder

Protein powders can be a great way to top up your protein intake. They’re versatile, convenient, and can be easier to digest and absorb than solid food proteins such as meat. They can be particularly beneficial if you struggle to get enough protein in your normal diet, whether this is due to poor appetite, poor digestion, or greater need – such as an intensive exercise programme, or recovering from illness or injury. 

So if you’ve decided to try a protein powder, or to change things up and try a different type, the next question is, which one? There are so many different options out there and it can all be a bit confusing! Cassandra Barns, Nutritonist, is here to give us her lowdown on all things protein powder.

Whey protein

Whey protein from milk is still the most widely available and popular type of protein powder. It contains a very high percentage of protein – usually 90% or more – and it has an excellent profile of amino acids (the individual ‘building blocks’ of protein), which means they’re present in more or less the exact proportions our body needs. Whey protein is also quickly and easily digested and absorbed compared to most other proteins. All these factors make it a top choice with gym-goers and those who are want to build strength or gain muscle.

There are also a few downsides to whey protein, however. It’s not suitable for vegans, of course. Those with a milk allergy can’t take it, and some people who are intolerant to dairy foods (without having a true allergy) also find that it doesn’t suit them. What’s more, a lot of whey proteins on the market – especially those aimed towards fitness or muscle-building – contain additives such as sweeteners and flavourings. So if you do go for whey, look for as natural a product as you can find.

Soya protein

Being plant-based, soya is an easy alternative for those who can’t have – or prefer to avoid – whey protein. Out of all the plant-based protein powders, it has two primary selling points that mimic the benefits of whey: it can contain a very high percentage of protein (up to 90%), and it also has a good amino acid profile, being a ‘complete’ protein. Some of the other plant proteins do not reach these standards!

And as an advantage over whey, unflavoured soya proteins are also quite versatile and can be used in savoury foods – stirred into soups or stews, for example – as well as in smoothies or shakes.

Soya powders can also contain more phytoestrogens – natural plant substances that can act like a weak oestrogen. This could be beneficial for women, especially around or after menopause. But for the same reason, there’s a potential that using soya protein powder regularly and long term may not be the best choice for men’s health.

Another downside to soya protein is that it can be less well tolerated than some of the other vegetable proteins (see below) for those who have food sensitivities or allergies.

Pea protein

Pea protein is an increasingly popular alternative to soya and whey. Again, it contains a relatively high percentage of protein – around 80% – so you need only a small amount of powder to get a good serving. Like unflavoured soya protein, it has a neutral flavour and mixes well into both sweet and savoury foods. Its advantages over soya protein are that it tends to be better tolerated by those who have food sensitivities or intolerances, and that it doesn’t contain the phytoestrogens that soya contains.

Pea protein powders are generally free from sugars and unnatural ingredients such as sweeteners and flavourings, so tend to be a good natural option (but check the label or product details before you buy!). 

Brown rice protein

Rice protein has several similarities to pea protein. It’s also well tolerated by those with food sensitivities. It can have a similar protein content, although sometimes a bit lower: 65–80%. It has a neutral flavour, mixes well and can be used in sweet and savoury foods. Another good choice.

Hemp protein

Hemp seed protein is quite different to many of the other options including soya, rice and pea. It’s usually less refined, making it a more natural or ‘whole food’ alternative. This also means it contains more of the other nutrients found in hemp seeds, including fibre and essential fatty acids. Hemp protein can also be a great source of magnesium from the hemp seeds – a nutrient that many of us are deficient in, even if we eat a healthy diet.

On the downside, this greater content of other nutrients means a lower content of protein – which is generally around 50%. So you get less protein for your money and relative to the amount of powder you need to use. Hemp protein also has a stronger flavour than most of the others – and is an acquired taste for some!

Sunflower seed protein

Sunflower seed protein is the latest newcomer to the plant protein market. Like hemp, it tends to be less refined than some of the others, and closer to a ‘whole food’. But again, this makes it lower in protein, at only around 50%. As an advantage over hemp, it has a milder flavour and, like pea and rice protein, mixes easily with many foods. Worth a try if you’re looking for an alternative to hemp protein or just a natural and mild-tasting protein powder.

Casein, or whey-casein blends

Lastly, you can find casein protein powders (sometimes called ‘micellar casein’). Casein is another protein from milk. It is often found in combination with whey in protein powders aimed towards muscle gain. Casein is digested and absorbed more slowly than whey protein, so the combination is said to provide both immediate protein replenishment to the muscles and a slower ‘drip-feed’, which makes it better for supporting muscle growth and a more effective protein to take in higher doses.

As it’s also from milk, casein protein is not ideal for everyone. It can, in fact, have more drawbacks than whey: it can be difficult to digest, and it’s more likely than whey to cause problems for those who are dairy-sensitive. If you can take whey but want a casein-free combination of fast-absorbing and slow-absorbing protein, try instead making your own mix of pure pea protein and whey.

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Posted on February 24, 2017

Degustabox February 2017

food

copy-of-5-things-32

As I’m trying to eat what I have in the house rather than buy more food to save money, Degustabox was more welcome than usual this month!

Some of my favourite things:

  • Willy’s Apple Cider Vinegar Popcorn – I love salt and vinegar crisps so these are a great alternative!
  • Bebeto Candy Crush Gummy Mix – I’m almost on level 700 of this game so this treat is totally something I appreciate!
  • Blossom Hill Fruit Twist- Wine is one of my favourite things! Pity about the low alcohol content 😉
  • New York Delhi’s Americanos – these chocolate covered coffee beans are so additibe. Yum.

You can get a whopping £7.00 discount, which means the first box will cost £5.99 with the code FAZHX at Degustabox.

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Posted on February 10, 2017

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

food

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Waitrose is helping its customers to shake up their breakfast with the launch of FUEL10K across its stores.
The active lifestyle brand is reinventing breakfast for busy people who are big on energy, short on time. Its innovative Quark Pouches and Protiflakes are a deliciously rich source of protein and fibre and have launched in last week.

FUEL10K founder Barney Mauleverer said: “We’re on a mission to make breakfast more exciting. Our FUEL10K products deliver a hit of fast, easy and healthy protein that is low in fat and keeps you fuller for longer.

“Like most people, we’re so time-starved that we haven’t got time to sit down to eat breakfast. That’s why we created a delicious breakfast range that does you good, keeps you going and doesn’t waste any of those precious morning minutes.”

FUEL10K QUARK WITH FRUIT

Quark is the next big thing at breakfast. Sounds all sciencey, huh? These innovative squeezy pouches of fruity deliciousness deliver a smooth yoghurt style breakfast.

FUEL10K Quark is naturally flavoured, high in protein and low in fat. Choose from Raspberry & Blueberry, Mango & Passionfruit, Strawberry & Banana and Vanilla Bean & Honey. Each 150g pouch costs £1.49.
They come in a cheeky re-sealable pack making them easy for you to fuel up whether you’re on your way to work, heading for a gym workout – or simply to grab as an easy-on-the-go snack.

PROTIFLAKES

The ultimate multi-grain flake cereal with a touch of FUEL10K magic, the flakes are packed with vitamins, high in protein, iron and fibre. A great start to the day. RRP £2.69.

Keep an eye out for these so you can start your day right!

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

Fuel10k Quark and Protiflakes

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Posted on February 1, 2017

Degustabox January 2017

food

Degustabox January 2017

I’m sure my poor neighbour is fed up of bringing me this box every month! It’s always delivered while I’m at work so I miss it every time, then my neighbour has to get it for me.

Anyway, this is the January 2017 Degustabox.

Degustabox January 2017

Popchips.

These are dangerous. If I open them, I will eat them all. I must get them out of my house ASAP before I ruin my diet. I’ll be taking these to my boyfriends, that’s for sure. A problem shared is a problem halved, after all.

They are popped instead of fried and have only 100 calories a serving. But who ever has just one serving?

£1.99

Degustabox January 2017

Yushoi Snapea Rice Sticks

Ahh, I love these so much. My favourite flavour is salt and vinegar and I’ve been known to eat a full packet all at once. 87 calories per serving…

They are a great source of protein, though. That’s what I keep telling myself!

£1.79

Degustabox January 2017

Quinola Mothergrain

This ready cooked organic packet of quinoa and split peas is vegan and gluten free. It’s a great source of protein. The only problem is I don’t have a microwave!

£2.49

Degustabox January 2017

Finn Crisp Seeds and Sea Salt

These are great for guilt free snacking. Perfect for the crisp fan like me! They’re high in fibre and have no added fat.

£1.89

Degustabox January 2017

Natvia 100% Natural Sweetener

Sometimes I love a bit of sweetener in my coffee or on my cereal. This sweetener is made from stevia plant and natural nectar and has only 0.4 calories per serving!

Jesus, is it expensive though!

£4.99

Degustabox January 2017

Fruittella 100% Less Sugar

I love Fruittella as a kid so I’m happy to see a reduced sugar version. It has even more juice than before, no sweeteners and natural colours and flavours!

£1.25

Degustabox January 2017

Little’s Natural French Vanilla Coffee

I’m not actually sure around the detail and price of this as it wasn’t on my sheet – but I’ve had vanilla coffee before and love it!

Degustabox January 2017

Chosan Hibiscus Drink

This fiery ginger beer is another one I know little about as it wasn’t on the sheet. Although I do live ginger beer!

Degustabox January 2017

Aspire Drinks

Yes, something to help me lose body fat! It has zero calories or sugar for great for when you’re watching your waistline. It’s full of ingredients that are good for you. Until I get a hold of it and pour vodka into it!

£1.45 each

Degustabox January 2017

Crabbie’s Ginger Beer

I love Crabbie’s Ginger Beer but I don’t think I’ve ever tried the raspberry one. It’s gluten free, too!

£1.89

Degustabox January 2017

The Chia Co

We all know chia seeds are good for you. They keep you full, are a great source of protein and have loads of fibre and Omega 3!

0.66p

Degustabox January 2017

Protein Boost

These are ready to drink protein shakes that have 20g of protein per serving. Great for on the go!

£1.29

Degustabox January 2017

Pip’s Real Hot Chocolate.

Another mystery not on my sheet. You melt this in a pan with milk to make real hot chocolate.

That’s it for the January Degustabox. I think this one was one of my favourite boxes. Woo!

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Posted on January 25, 2017

Avoid crisps with Graze box

food

graze box crisp alternatives

Working with Graze is awesome when you get packagings tailored to your needs. Before Christmas, they asked me which package from 4 to pick from I would like to help me achieve me 2017 health and fitness goals.

Naturally, I picked the beat crisp cravings package which contained samples from their range of crisp alternatives.

They also sent me a book with dip recipes complete with a blender to help me. Being a cheese fiend, the cheese board one was my favourite. I wasn’t a fan of the beetroot crisp one as I hate beetroot. Doom.

Check them out for yourself for a healthier salty snack than crisps!

graze box crisp alternatives

graze box crisp alternatives

graze box crisp alternatives

graze box crisp alternatives

graze box crisp alternatives

graze box crisp alternatives

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Posted on January 7, 2017

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

food

copy-of-5-things-8

I made food. Healthy food. Yeah, buddy!

I wanted to use this Seamore I sea pasta and wasn’t sure how to attack it. I had recently tried some seaweed snacks in Degustabox and they had a strong taste. I thought it best I make a seafood based dish.

I decided to make a tagliatelle with monkfish.

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

You will need:

  • Monkfish tail
  • Mushrooms
  • Peppers
  • 20g seaweed pasta
  • king prawns
  • oil
  • seasoning
  • 200g a tomato based sauce

I first seasoned the monkfish tail with olive oil, garlic and herbs. I wrapped it in foil and put it in the oven on 220c for around 20 minutes.

While that was cooking, I soaked the seaweed pasta in hot water for 15 mins.

I fried the peppers and mushroom. When they were done, I added the sauce, prawns and then drained the sea weed pasta and added that.

After warming for around 10 minutes, I plated it up with monkfish, that had been sat cooling in foil for around 5 minutes.

The dish was perfect. I loved the monkfish and the sea weed pasta was not as fishy as I had feared! It did have a slight taste but took most of the taste of the sauce.

Overall, it was a successful meal!

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

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Posted on January 5, 2017

I Sea Pasta

food

I Sea Pasta

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Organic, gluten free, low carb, low calorie, vegan, seastainable, non gmo. Sounds like the ideal food for health and fitness lovers.

I sea pasta looks like tagliatelle but is 100% wild, handpicked and organic seaweed from Connomara, Ireland. It is a fresh sea vegetable ready to be used as pasta, veggies or anything in between.

Monkfish and Seaweed Pasta

Each bag has 100g, which is 5 servings. Sock them in hot water for 10 minutes then they’re ready to be eaten, or to be added to a saucy dish.

Check back on Saturday to see how I made a monkfish and prawn dish with this!

I Sea Pasta

I Sea Pasta

I Sea Pasta

I Sea Pasta

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